Twenty Twenty Two-mer

I have lost the ability to see things in terms of years. When you are cancery, or perhaps when you are walking through any difficult patch of life, time is not measured in long swaths. It is measured in, ‘bitch, am I going to make it through the next hour?!’ 2016 taught me many things,…

Greg

The flurry of tests, scans & appointments is in full swing. A few days ago my sister took me to the hospital for a CT scan from my pubic bone to my neck to look for distant metastases. This involved getting there 2 hours early to pick up ‘the drink.’ Over the course of the…

AGAIN

Christmas, 2021. At the age of 41, I was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time (pause for hysterical laughter–she’s kidding right?) Two weeks ago, I saw my oncologist for a regular appointment. She did an exam, as she always does. She found a lump on my cancerous side. I had an ultrasound the…

Tick, Tick, Tick

Chapter One A handful of hours after our wedding, my husband got sick, like super-sick. As I was still a 27 year old bozo, I immediately called my mom. She was also sick. The calls kept coming in; many, many people were sick. By lunchtime, 5 of our friends and family, including my new husband,…

5 Years

5 years ago today I was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma breast cancer. It seems both a billion years ago and like yesterday. As time has passed some of the details have started to fade. I can’t remember the names of certain tests or drugs, the post-op rules or even the names of important players….

Disgrace

Any detectable level of the disease has been eradicated. That is what we are told when we are declared NED, or No Evidence of Disease after treatment. They don’t call it remission anymore because no one can say for sure that every last cancer cell was demolished so instead they say you are NED, which…

The Waiting Room

7:00am It is eerie to be the only person in a very large surgical waiting room. The only reason I am even allowed here is because the person I am waiting for is my 12 year old son. He has broken the same arm twice this year and is having surgery to place metal pins,…

Our Renaissance

In July there was an article in The New Yorker by Lawrence Wright about the new phenomenon of art and culture in Renaissance Italy. It arose from the ashes of the horrific ‘Black Death’ plague in the Middle Ages. Let me reiterate that– we needed THE PLAGUE to grow the artistic bounty of our pals…

Quarantine Tips From a Cancer Survivor

Quarantine. It is the hottest topic of 2020. It is so now. It is creating so much buzz. Everyone is doing it. (fire emoji, fire emoji). Not all trends are good ones. Remember Hammer pants and over-plucked eyebrows? Quarantine is most certainly one of the worst trends I can think of in recent history. Maybe only feathered…

Marvel

Some of you may remember that I had breast cancer in 2016. It’s 2020, which means that I have been beleaguering this story for approx 3.5 years. Thing is, even with a categorization of NED (no evidence of disease), cancer is a chronic disease. And even though I don’t have the solid visuals for you…

The Kid Collateral

Long time, no blog. I have missed writing Grancer so much, but the great news is that I haven’t had much cancery stuff to say. Recently a cancery pal of mine sent me a DM asking if I ever thought about writing about my kids and how I handled cancer as a parent. I think…

The Art of Caregiving

When I was sick with breast cancer, people all around me stopped what they were doing to care for me. This took the shape of friends re-arranging their schedules to drive my kids around, my husband becoming the husband and the wife, and my mom and sister screeching their lives to a halt to basically…